Art Show Opening

Monotype aquatint etching 1/1

Monotype aquatint etching
1/1

 

Showing one of my aquatint etching monotypes from the series:”Natural History”,’Natural History: Memories”.

Group exhibit juried by Ginny Sykes With concurrent group exhibit Humans Being II curated by Riva Lehrer

May 10 – June 20, 2013 / Opening Reception: Friday, May 10, 6–9 p.m.

CHICAGO — Woman Made Gallery (WMG) presents a group exhibition with works by 21 artists, juried by Ginny Sykes. Body and Brain is an exhibit that focuses on the relationship between mind and body, with interpretations in a variety of media including painting, sculpture, video, and photography works.

Ginny Sykes’ work includes painting, performance, installation, film, and public art. She has exhibited in national and international exhibitions. Her public artwork includes private commissions, community based projects, schools, parks, and civic spaces. Sykes has taught in both the Museum and the School of

the Art Institute of Chicago, the Evanston Art Center and Lill Street Arts Center and is an Illinois Arts Council Roster Artist. Sykes is a core artist with Chicago Public Art Group. Her work is included in the publications A Guide to Chicago Murals, Urban Art Chicago, andThe Chicago Public Art Guide. Sykes is currently pursuing her Master’s Degree in the Women and Gender Studies Department at Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois.

Included artists are Nicole Alger, Aviva Alter, Marcia Babler, Sharon Bladholm, Robin Carlson, Jennifer Chammas, Susan Emmerson, Sharon Gilmore, Polly Greathouse, Judith Hladik-Voss, Hannamari Jalovaara, Elizabeth Jameson, Hannah King, Rahshia Linendoll-Sawyer, Roberta Malkin, Maryellen Murphy, Sally Raab, Nirmal Raja, Kathryn Shinko, Jennifer Tiner, Kathy Weaver, and Gail Willert.

Woman Made Gallery 685 N. Milwaukee Ave. Chicago, IL 60642 Website: www.womanmade.org

Gallery Hours: Wed–Fri noon–7p.m. / Sat–Sun noon–4p.m. / Admission: Free

Woman Made Gallery is supported in part by grants from the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency; a CityArts Program II grant from the City of Chicago, Department of Cultural Affairs; the Arts Work Fund for Organizational Development, a donor-advised fund of the Chicago Community Trust; the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation; The Efroymson Family Fund, a CICF Fund; a major anonymous donor; and the generosity of its members and contributors.

International Printers Network- Collograph Demo- Progress Report #3

Good Morning!

I’ve been busy the past week-hands on artwork on the Man Who Couldn’t Hear Orange.  Making some odd discoveries about the finishing of the background textile area.  Serendipitous solutions happening.  Will post pix when finished with the oddity section!

Wanted to share a website for printmakers.  I joined up and made a swell page in under and hour.  It’s Free!  I ended up with a page /picture gallery that can be viewed as a slide show. Artist’s statement.  You can upload video/links/and blog on the site.  Looks very clean and professional.

INKTERACTION     International Printmakers Network

This is the link to my page-check it out and see if it suits your needs!

http://inkteraction.ning.com/profile/JudithHladikVoss 

Today’s print is a drypoint collograph.  A direct and inexpensive way to print.  Does require a press!  The plate is made from matboard, coated front and back with artist’s acrylic gesso.  ( Usually 3 times front/twice back. Let dry between coatings.  You can texture the plate with brushstrokes, or make a relatively smooth surface.) The front and back are sprayed with an acrylic coating-twice each side).  All you need is an etching needle, or some similar sharp point to draw into the plate.

I used oil printers ink-not too stiff! and a tarlatan to wipe/finish wipe with newspaper. I used a strong, colored Japanese paper-wet! to print. This print was Chine collé’d to Tan Rives BFK when the original print had dried. I can get at least 10-20 images from a plate. Since drypoint can be so unforgiving, I find this frees me up to be more experimental.  So much cheaper than copper!

Clean up should use very little liquid/solvent.  The more wet the plate gets, the shorter time it will last.  The liquid seeps into the lines of the plate and the paper absorbs it.  A good idea to edition the plate in one or two sessions.

I usually prepare multiple plates at a time-in modest sizes-so i have a stock on hand when the mood strikes.  If you have any questions-contact me!

This print of coiled snakes has been printed on many colors of paper, and used in some of my Natural History monoprints…

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